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Old 01/12/2013, 01:59 PM   #1
robert campbell
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Fuel Line Warning

All,
This may be old thoughts to the experienced GT/CS and HCS restorer such as Marty and Neil, but I stumbled onto this while upgrading my GNS to a 1/2 inch Moroso Aluminum fuel line.

Follow your fuel line behind the “front” of the left front tire along the frame rail. Move to behind the front tire and see it as it disappears from the wheel well going back into the frame torque box area. Now get a piece of cardboard lay just about at the front of the front door and look up. You will see it as it exits behind the torque box and you will see a small section of rubber fuel line that connects the back section of fuel line to front section with two hose clamps. It is about 4 to 6 inches long.

Now over the years I have replaced many of these fuel line sections on 1968 Mustangs. They are often overlooked and they can break and start spilling a lot of gas.....

But wait, as Marty and Neil know, and I do now. THERE'S MORE!!

The section of the front line that is “not visible” in the torque box area is subjected to a lot of moisture. As I was undoing my claps for the rubber section a lot of fuel started coming out. I quickly got a pan and ran to the back. Yes, bag brag, it is on my four post lift and I clamped the fuel line at the gas tank sending unit with a vice grip. No damage no fire!!! Upon further inspection I thought that the rubber hose spilt or broke, but NNNNOOO! The steel fuel line inside torque box area was so corroded and thin it just basically broke in half.

All GT/CS and HCS owners should take a look at the rubber line as a minimum. My car was, and, is not rusty and a very solid NW car. But the front tire keeps moisture is this area any time you drive on a wet road. For most owners not a problem. But how long have you owned you car? And how many early wet miles was it subjected to? Look at the corrosion on this area of my fuel line you can’t see.

Rob



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Old 01/12/2013, 02:38 PM   #2
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Deja Vu, a friend of mine had this very same scenario happen to him this week, while making his 1970 CJ car roadworthy.

Scott Behncke
1968 GT/CS 302-4V Honors flysis income beezis onches nobis inob keesis
West Coast Classic Cougar A good source for Mustang mechanical parts too.
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Old 01/12/2013, 05:26 PM   #3
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Rob this is a very common problem here in the rust belt. If it is not a concours car I would recomend replacing it with a stainless section on the front. Man I hate that when you have gas running all over and can't stop it. I am glad there was not a hot light or spark! Marty

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Old 01/12/2013, 09:55 PM   #4
robert campbell
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After what I saw, this is not just a rust belt problem. Any owner of a 68 and newer first gen Mustang should take a look. Not a huge danger problem from ignition from the car itself..... But in a garage with a furnace and a huge ball of gas.........

67 cars, which I have worked on the most, do not have this 68 and newer gas line routing. Warning for all!

Rob
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Old 01/12/2013, 10:24 PM   #5
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Rob only the early 67s had the tunnel routing. The later were just like the 68s.
Marty

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Old 01/13/2013, 05:42 AM   #6
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The area Rob described is typically overlooked, as the front fuel line is routed through a blind area. It would behoove everyone to inspect the fuel line and replace as required. For concourse autos, the 'standard' steel line is fine. For driven cars the stainless is much better, and isn't that much more costly.

Neil

Last edited by franklinair; 01/13/2013 at 06:15 AM..
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Old 01/13/2013, 09:13 AM   #7
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On kind of a related subject. I see a lot of old rusty mustangs brought back from the dead and then 5-6 hunderd horsepower dropped in. Then they are taken out and ridden hard with some distasterious structural failers do to poor repairs and hidden rust that went unrepaired. A thoroughly rust free car or a new Dinacorn body is a much better bet if you are going to really put your car through the paces.
Just a thought.
Marty

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Old 01/13/2013, 10:12 AM   #8
robert campbell
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By the way I have a very nice original "rear" section with all the clamps, bolts and the protective cover (and bolts) at the rear where it turns to go towards the outside of the car. free free free, but you pay shipping!

Rob
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Old 01/13/2013, 10:32 AM   #9
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Doesn't anyone manufacture/sell just the front section (fuel pump-to-coupling)? That's where the problem occurs.
I've made my own, using a tube bending tool & flaring tool.
Marty- I cringe when I read of high power engines dropped into a 40-to-50 year old chassis.
Age coupled with the newly imposed stress. These cars were not designed for 400-500HP engines. Models with the 390's are notorious for shock towers cracking- even when they were relatively new. But that's just old worry wart me!

Neil
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Old 01/13/2013, 10:57 AM   #10
robert campbell
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Neil,
Sub frame connectors, escort braces, monte carlo bars! Weld the shock towers and start with a decent rust free body as Marty said!

The big blocks added a ton of weight on the front that I believe contributed to to alot of the cracking up front in the tower area.

And as David did, you add a 12 point roll cage!! Solid as a rock!

Rob
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Old 01/13/2013, 10:59 AM   #11
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I think that the front half can be bought from Classic tube. I may a a exta fronts laying around all though it is most likly not stainless steel. I would go ahead and change the whole line because often they rust on the inside too. That is a big problem with cars that have sat around.
Just my two cents. Marty

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Old 01/23/2013, 10:32 AM   #12
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When I replaced my fuel tank I noticed the rubber hose was bent a little and it had cracked where the bend was. Sunday I pulled it out the garage and something told me to look under the hood. The filter that screws into the carb was clogged and gas was leaking on the manifold. So I replaced the filter and no leaks. That's what I get from not driving the car.
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Old 01/25/2013, 11:23 PM   #13
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Good info Rob. I replaced mine last fall. Only because it had come loose from the frame clamp behind the wheel and was rubbing a hole in the tube where it rested against the torque box. All better now.

Bret
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